Torrens Island Quarantine Station Ghost Hunt

Torrens Island Quarantine Station Ghost Hunt - Adelaide Haunted Horizons

Torrens Island Quarantine Station Ghost Hunt: Port Adelaide ghost hunts

Join us on our Torrens Island Quarantine Station Ghost Hunt in Port Adelaide, and discover for yourself if ghostly activity happens as much in daytime as it does at night!

Torrens Island Quarantine Station History

Torrens Island was first used by the Kaurna people pre-white settlement and in fact only recently, 70 of the Kaurna people have been reburied on the Island in an undisclosed location.

The first settler to set up there was a gentleman by the name of Isaac Yeo, who established a dairy farm, the ruins of which still remain on the Island today. Isaac was asked to leave the Island once the Quarantine Station was proposed.

It was in 1850 that it was seen that there was a need for a working Quarantine site, especially after two ships arrived, the Trafalgar which carried Typhus and then the Taymouth Castle which carried smallpox.

Until this time quarantine had taken the form of just anchoring ships in the gulf until the ‘all clear’ was given.

Although there were records of a Quarantine camp on the Island in operation by 1855, a proper station wasn’t established there until around 1877-78. The station was around 551 acres and intended to accommodate 224 people.

This Quarantine Station went on to protect South Australians from highly contagious diseases for almost 100 years.

In 1914, an internment camp or, as it was called then, a concentration camp, was established about 500 metres south of the Quarantine Station.

It housed around 400 men of mainly German background. The site of the camp is thought to be now under the power station.

From fair to a farce

Torrens Island Quarantine Station

During it’s time the camp had a dubious history. At first it was run fairly but not harshly. However, once a new commander took charge, Capt Hawkes, conditions deteriorated rapidly until it was quietly closed in 1915 and the internees transferred to a more humanely run camp at Holsworthy.

A complaint was put in about the treatment of the people under Capt Hawkes command which included floggings and bayonet stabbings.

He was finally dismissed in 1916 and the official records of the camp destroyed.

During its time in operation, 10 deaths were recorded at the Quarantine Station.

Four of these people died by 1896 and then in 1918 the troopship Boonah returned from South Africa with the Spanish flu and five of these soldiers died and were buried in the cemetery on the Island.

One headstone remains a mystery as the name inscribed on it was found to have died in Launceston and not on the Island.

The last passenger was admitted in 1966 and the last disease of any concern was smallpox.

However, after the extinction of this disease, which was declared in 1979, the Quarantine Station was closed to people in 1980.

Parts of the Island continues to be used for animal quarantine which has been ongoing since 1879.

Torrens Island Quarantine Station Ghost Hunt

Join our exclusive Torrens Island, Quarantine Station Ghost Hunt on this seldom visited chapter of South Australia’s history.

Have you ever wondered if ghostly activity happens during the day?  Well now is your chance to find out!

This tour is conducted in daytime, but don’t let this put you off, as we have certainly had results on past tours.

After all, if ghosts are present they should be there day or night!

Explore an Island where disease laid claim to victims and one which hosted the worst run internment camp in Australian history.

Search for the figures that have been reported, including that of a soldier.. before he disappeared into thin air!

Try for EVP (electronic voice phenomena) or try for responses on the Ghost Box.

Listen also for those disembodied voices that have been heard on tours before.

Walking around the abandoned buildings, you really don’t feel that you are alone, even in the daytime!

The Doctor seems to still be in his house, still attending to the sick, whilst the American Cottage still feels occupied.

It is unusual doing an investigation in the daylight, but the opportunity to investigate this unique premises and the possible paranormal results are definitely worth a go.

Information Sources:
http://trove.nla.gov.au/
NAA – http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/fact-sheets/fs228.aspx
Maritime Museum Handbook
Wikipedia

Torrens Island Quarantine Station Ghost Hunt details

These are daytime tours and run on certain Sunday afternoons, however the tour will be postponed in Summer due to snake problems.

Duration: 4 hours

Cost: $85 pp.

Tours: Age 18+

Minimum numbers need to be reached for tour to go ahead.

Torrens Island Quarantine Station Ghost Hunt - Adelaide Haunted Horizons
Adelaide’s Haunted Horizons reserves the right to cancel an event should numbers not be reached or if property owners decide to use locations for their own events.  If this happens money will be refunded in full or another date offered. Please note, although the stories that are told are real,  Haunted Horizon’s™ naturally can NOT promise you a ghost on the night, we can however ensure you have an enjoyable and fun night.  For this reason these tours and workshops should be viewed as entertainment only.

Book with the local operator you can trust. Haunted Horizons™, has been named best Tour Operator in the South Australian Tourism Awards 2015 and 2016. You will also be booking with professional paranormal investigators (PFI) who’ve been operating more than 15 years.

How to check dates/book your tour

  1. Press ‘Book Now’ below for dates.
  2. To pay, simply press ‘book now’
  3. Choose number of tickets
  4. Choose pay by Credit Card or Paypal
  5. Any problems then contact us.
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For more information

Email: Haunted Horizons
Phone: 0407 715 866

No tickets will be sent, unless a gift voucher is needed. Print out the email/payment details and bring with you.

Please read our terms and conditions before booking your tour. We will assume you have read and agreed to these, when you book.

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